Prof Chris Brewster and Dr Washika Haak-Saheem will present a paper at the 3rd HR Division International Conference in January

27 November 2018

Prof Chris Brewster and Dr Washika Haak-Saheem will present a paper at the 3rd HR Division International Conference in January

Prof Chris Brewster and Dr Washika Haak-Saheem will be presenting a jointly written paper titled: ‘HRM and hidden expatriates: the motives, processes and organisational justice of low-status global workers’, during the 3rd HR Division International Conference, at the University of Dublin, on 9-11 January 2019.

Abstracts of papers presented at the Conference

HRM and hidden expatriates: the motives, processes and organisational justice of low-status global workers

Scholars have recently challenged the notion of ‘high-skilled’ and ‘high-paid’ expatriation as overly simplistic, elitist, and failing to recognize the many millions of people who engage with the labor market as medium- to low-paid global workers, among them nurses, maids, security guards, cleaners, beauticians, and construction and agricultural workers. Building on the notion of ‘hidden expatriates’, and in line with long-standing calls for more theories and more voices in organization studies, we widen understanding of expatriates and expatriation by bringing into the scholarly discussion the human resource management of low-status global workers. We examine who they are, their motivations, and the processes by which they enter the labor market. Through the lens of organizational justice theory, we critique the HRM of hidden expatriates using concepts of voice, and vulnerable and decent work, from which we develop research questions to spur more scholarly work in this area.

Towards more relevant HRM research: Understanding the role of HRM in corporate sustainability and social responsibility

The growing economic, social and environmental problems faced around the world – ‘grand challenges’ – are accompanied by increased pressure for corpora­tions to engage in corporate sustainabil­ity and social responsibility (CS/ CSR). Human resource management (HRM) has a potentially vital role to play in both devel­oping and implementing an organization’s CS/ CSR strategy, but has thus-far failed to deliver. In explaining the fail­ure of HRM to deliver we point to several factors, including failure on the part of HRM researchers to offer actionable solutions to HRM practitioners, as well as an emphasis on organizational performance and shareholder value as the sole objective of HRM systems. We argue that if we are to make HRM research rele­vant we must adopt a multi-stakeholder perspec­tive on HRM that looks beyond shareholder value maximization and considers a broader array of criteria including long-term value creation and preserva­tion, employee well-being, societal welfare, and environmental sus­tainability.

Contact Image

Contact Us

If you have any questions, please contact Daria Radwan by email at d.m.radwan@henley.ac.uk or by phone on +44 (0) 118 378 6597.