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Lessons from the Lexicon: understanding success

Lexicon1

New research provides a toolkit of ideas for developers and civic leaders, looking at the valuable behaviours and management ideas for those leading a large-scale development project.

Called ‘The Lexicon – Understanding success in major town centre regeneration’, the report shows Bracknell’s redevelopment tackled a town centre that was characterised by an unfashionable, modern ‘New Town’ architectural style with a deteriorating physical fabric; by shops that were unfit for purpose, and a firm view of the local community that the town centre needed to be transformed into a new social and cultural heart for the borough.

The research offers expert advice to those looking to embark on town centre regeneration, including those in former New Towns.

Dr Emma Street, Associate Professor of Urban Policy and Governance at Henley Business School said:

“While New Towns face many regeneration challenges, they also offer opportunities to create places that serve communities, ensuring the values at the heart of the original New Towns programme endure for decades to come.

Town centre regeneration is currently at a crossroads. Our research sheds light on the challenges those looking to deliver regeneration face, but also the opportunities that exist to create town centres fit for the future.”

Victor Nicholls, Lecturer in Development and Planning at Henley Business School said:

“We’ve been fortunate in being able to learn valuable lessons from such a wide range of participants and stakeholders involved in delivering and operating one of the UK’s largest and most complex town centre regeneration schemes in recent years.

Perhaps one of the most useful points to emerge from our research was the importance of reviewing the myriad aspects of complex regeneration projects, from the perspective of professionals engaged in the scheme”.

Victor Nicholls

Lecturer in Development and Planning

Dr Emma Street

Associate Professor of Urban Policy and Governance
Published 19 July 2022
Topics:
Henley news Research news