World of Work: 2030

As technology transforms the world of work, the question we ask is, how can business education help shape the future to meet the needs of employers by the year 2030?

WOW - the next chapter

We are delighted to announce that the second World of Work Conference will be held on 13 September 2018.

In September 2017, Henley Careers put on a showcase conference World of Work: 2030 bringing together like minded people to discuss the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead, to reflect on change and to gain inspiration from a range of leading authorities in this area: futurists, digital strategists, entrepreneurs, economists, occupational psychologists and pioneers in artificial intelligence and technology. Ultimately we want to create a community of like-minded people who are curious and committed to working together at the forefront of technological change. We aim to lead the conversation on both human and digital skills needed in the new World of Work.

This is the website from the day. It provides a flavour of the themes from the event but it also offers an opportunity for you to get involved in the conversation - there's much to talk about! Start by putting the conference date for WOW2 into your calendar - Thursday 13 September 2018 - more information on this to follow soon, together with details of a Spring 2018 webinar.


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Work 4.0

Work 4.0

The Digital Age is having a profound impact on the nature of work. Understanding the underlying forces that are driving the future will help us prepare and reshape for an evolving work landscape.

Don’t fear the robot reaper

Don’t fear the robot reaper

How can we better adapt Careers work to meet the impact of the future of work? Grasping current research on career resilience and personality traits will enable us to embrace the future with greater confidence.

Staying human

Staying human

How can people and organisations get the best from each other in 2030?
Individual identity and strengths will eclipse skills in the emerging tech-led economy if we want to keep work human-shaped.

Geopolitics AI & automation

Geopolitics AI & automation

Automation and AI's impacts will have profound, long term and disruptive effects across jobs, industries and countries. Understanding the 'geopolitical winners and losers' will be of paramount importance for business investment and strategic planning.

HR in a changing world

HR in a changing world

The world is changing and we need to change (or forget it). There's a clear opportunity for professionals in the HR field to be more pioneering, agile and creative when faced with the challenges presented under the broad banner of the future of work.

Avoid the ‘great idea trap’

Avoid the ‘great idea trap’

How do great ideas get stuck and never see the light of day?
Successful entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs need to avoid the 'great idea trap' and instead role model critical behaviours to bring about collective impact.

From information to wisdom

From information to wisdom

Digital detox: how do you manage information overload and transform it to make wise choices and maximise goodness and joy in your working day?

The FinTech revolution

The FinTech revolution

FinTech - the good, the bad and the ugly: How FinTech is changing the financial services industry and what you need to know about the implications.

Virtual is the new reality!

Virtual is the new reality!

As consumers, we’re surrounded by virtual reality based experiences. Pioneering L&D leaders are using VR to improve training results in projects of ever increasing scale.

Managing change and ambiguity

Managing change and ambiguity

Is this the key competency needed to operate in, and deal with, a digital world?

Digital skills for analogue minds

Digital skills for analogue minds

5 pillars of success for non-robots: identifying the skills required in 2030.

Humanising recruitment via game technology and AI

Humanising recruitment via game technology and AI

How AI can improve human decision-making if used in the right way.

Digital leadership: the capability for the future

Digital leadership: the capability for the future

The emergence of digital technologies has changed the rules of the game to the point where the leadership needs to coevolve with the development of the organisation.

Developing an employability strategy fit for the future

Developing an employability strategy fit for the future

The future of employability provision in universities particularly the key strategy attributes and the essentials of what careers provision might look like in 2030.

Analysis from a panel of experts

Analysis from a panel of experts

Highlights from The Institute of Student Employers (AGR) re: digital futures, Chartered Association of Business Schools, and Design Thinking Ltd

Blurring the divide between human and machine

Maddy Woodman, the Learning & Development lead for Henley Careers, asks where is the line between human emotion and artificial intelligence?

The main thing we can all agree on is that the difference between humans and machines is emotion. Robots can't feel hurt, anger, happiness or joy and don't care about how they are treated (yet!).

If you haven't already, get on YouTube and watch the video of Boston Dynamics and their backflipping robot (Atlas) that is programmed to move smoothly, pick itself up if it gets knocked over and continue on with the task at hand. See how this video makes you feel – does it fascinate you, or is it uncomfortable watching?

When Boston released their video of Atlas in action, complete with a guy and a hockey stick prodding him to push "him" over – there was an outcry from the public. It made people feel deep routed empathy, a feeling that they were watching a grown man "bully" a "defenceless" robot.

So where is the line between human emotion and artificial intelligence? It's definitely a lot more blurred than you think.

Dolby – the film and television sound experts – has developed their own biophysical lab measuring human emotions in order to "hack" Hollywood. Neuroscientists are currently studying how audio and video can affect the human body. Volunteers are hooked up to wires upon wires measuring their heartbeat, what makes their faces flush, and their specific reactions to movies. On top of this, lie detectors are used to ensure that the feedback given is as accurate as possible. Films like Up and Inside Out are classic examples of films that have been tweaked and improved in order to invoke as much emotion as possible, based upon direct feedback from these studies (and who hasn't cried at Up?!). Inside Out's scene where baby Joy is born was specifically created to evoke a physiological feeling of pain, a reflection of real life birth. This kind of technological response is already happening, and you won't even know it.

So how does this translate into the future world of work and recruitment? Well – on a larger scale, it seems human emotions detected by machines will be up for sale, in order to boost user experience. Organisations are now thinking about a multi-sensory space, and how they can create not only emotional, but physiological reactions to entertainment and beyond. Netflix and Hulu are using eye tracking devices to measure user reactions to their app interfaces. So how long is it until Careers Services, HR departments and pretty much any other service start to measure reactions in order to create the ultimate experience? Imagine being able to tweak what we do in order to effectively engage and evoke the best reactions in our students, staff and customers...

It's already happening in recruitment; Unilever are using HireVue's AI to scan video interviewees' emotions in order to detect inherent traits, body language and tone. It seems those days of being able to exaggerate certain parts of your CV are over! Will allowing AI to aid us in making recruitment decisions based on facial recognition decrease unconscious bias? What kind of ethical dilemmas does selling human emotions for user experience and ultimately profit, bring?

The future is upon us and whether we like it or not; through entertainment, service design and technology. You could already be experiencing this blurred line between machine and human - and you wouldn't even know.

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